Discovery Day (D-Day) a day NEVER FORGOTTEN

Discovery Day is the very first day that you discover your partner has been cheating on you. This day will forever be ingrained in your memory. You will count the years you have made it from this day. At first you will count the days, then the weeks, then the months. For the first 2 years you can give someone the exact amount of time from this day; days, weeks and months. An anniversary that you will always acknowledge and dread or if you are lucky you may be able to pretend and pass over this day with no huge fuss.

Very similar to when you first heard about the 9-11 World Trade Center’s crashing down. Or when you first learned of a close loved one passing. In my case the memory of D-Day is stronger than 9-11 and a family member passing. You will never forget the weather on this day, the smells in the air, what you were doing, and you will remember exactly where you were, and who you were with. You will always remember a life before this day and reminisce on how it used to be, most of the time shedding tears because all you want to do is go back. Your whole world is flipped upside down on D-Day. You will never be the same person again. Your heart shatters into a million pieces and you will forever be picking them up and putting them together. For the first year (sometimes longer) you will wake up everyday and it will feel exactly like you are just learning of a loved one’s sudden unexpected death. As time goes on, it does get easier but is always there like a dark cloud over your head about to strike you with a bolt of lightening reminding you of your loss. Those bolts are the triggers that you will experience repeatedly for an indefinite amount of time.

If you are lucky you will never experience a day like this or never have to go through it again. In my case I have had 2 D-Days and so do many other infidelity survivors. We survivors are some of the strongest and loving people.

abstract break broken broken glass
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4 responses to “Discovery Day (D-Day) a day NEVER FORGOTTEN”

  1. […] deep down knowing that 38 was the year of change for me. Since September 3rd of 2015 my first D-Day (LINK), up until my birthday last year I went through a huge […]

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  2. […] I have never known guilt until a little over a year ago when I was able to look back on the last few years and how much my life had flipped upside down. I cannot help but feel guilty for not being there for my children as I should have. I am still not there for them as much as I would like. I am currently under constant anxiety attacks.  I am dealing with a second round of recovery.  (Read my story here) It was when I mentioned this to my therapist I was reminded that my absence as a parent was not all my fault and was a 50/50 thing. My husband was just as much at fault.   My current therapist reminded me that when we grow up, we are never taught that we are going to be several people throughout our lifetime, and it is perfectly okay to change.  Their words give me some comfort, but I do miss the parent I was before D-Day. […]

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  3. […] you have a traumatic event happen such as a betrayal in your marriage AKA D-Day your whole world crumbles to the ground and flips upside down.  I survived it once and I will […]

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  4. […] I have never known guilt until a little over a year ago when I was able to look back on the last few years and how much my life had flipped upside down. I cannot help but feel guilty for not being there for my children as I should have. I am still not there for them as much as I would like. I am currently under constant anxiety attacks.  I am dealing with a second round of recovery.  (Read my story here) It was when I mentioned this to my therapist I was reminded that my absence as a parent was not all my fault and was a 50/50 thing. My husband was just as much at fault.   My current therapist reminded me that when we grow up, we are never taught that we are going to be several people throughout our lifetime, and it is perfectly okay to change.  Their words give me some comfort, but I do miss the parent I was before D-Day. […]

    Like

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